Deri

Deri Memorial plaques web


Below are the names of those who are commemorated (those who died in the 1st World War are in black, those in the 2nd World War are in brown and italics). The information on this page is taken mainly from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website. Click on the poppy, when available, for more information on an individual. If you can help or if you would like to add some information to what we have - please contact us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Deri 1914-18 & 1939-45

Names on Memorial  Additional Information
Alexander Andrews Alexander Andrews
Private 16636 Royal Irish Regiment 2nd Battalion.
Died November 11 1918.
Grave in the North Corner, Bougnies Communal Cemetery, Hainaut, Belgium.
Peter Blake Peter Blake
Private 16405 King's4 Shropshire Light Infantry 2nd Battalion.
Died April 25 1915.
Panel 47 and 49. Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.
William Alfred Clevey William Alfred Clevey
Flight Sergeant 1266119 RAFVR 103 Squadron.
Died (aged 22) May 28 1944.
Commemorated Panel 216 Runnymede Memorial.
Son of Thomas and Florence Clevey and husband of Rose Hannah Clevey (Gilfach).
Reginald Clifford Reginald Clifford
Gunner W/2313 Royal Field Artillery "D" Battery, 121st Brigade.
Died July 17 1916, age 30.
Grave II. E. I. Dantzig Alley British Cemetery, Mametz, Somme, France.
Son of William George and Alice Arm Clifford, of 3, Council Holdings, Cheddar, Somerset. Native of Bathford, Bath.
James Cooper James Cooper
Sapper 146915 Royal Engineers 250th Tunnelling Company.
Died May 8 1916.
Grave IV, Forges-Les-Eaux Communal Cemetery, Seine-Maritime, France.
David Davies David Davies
Private 33773 Welsh Regiment 9th Battalion.
Died July 1 1916, age 27.
Grave V. E. 1, Ovillers Military Cemetery, Somme, France.
Son of Enoch and Ruth Davies, of Dowlais, Glam; husband of Margaret Jane Davies.
Isaac Thomas Davies Isaac Thomas Davies
Private 22860 Welsh Regiment 2nd Battalion.
Died October 23 1918, age 36.
Grave I. D. 8, Highland Cemetery, Le Cateau, Nord, France
Husband of Sophia Davies, of 17, Upper Rd., Cwm-syfiog, Mon.
Ralph Augustus Duck Ralph Augustus Duck
Private 117577 Machine Gun Corps 50th Battalion.
Died August 9 1918, age 23.
Grave B. 19. Vignacourt British Cemetery, Somme, France
Son of Matilda Duck and the late Edgar Albert Duck, of Darran Cottage, Deri, Cardiff.
David James Evans David James Evans
Private 7289 Welsh Regiment 2nd Battalion.
Died October 25 1914.
Panel 37, Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.
William Evans William Evans
Private 15984 Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry 7th Battalion.
Died November 26 1915, age 20.
Grave I. A. 11, Mericourt-L'abbe Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France.
Son of John and Mary Evans, of Blakemoor Flat, Snailbeach, Shrewsbury.
David Robert Gabb David Robert Gabb
Gunner 3905431 Royal Artillery 453 Battery, 68 (1st Rifle Battalion, The Monmouthshire Regiment) Searchlight Regiment.
Died March 8 1941, age 38.
Section B. Grave 3500, Gwaelod-y-brithdir Cemetery, Bargoed, Glamorganshire.
Son of Robert J. Gabb and Margaret Blodwen Gabb; husband of Tydfil Mary Gabb, of Deri.
Edgar Francis Giles Edgar Francis Giles
Private 23818 Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry 1st Battalion.
Died 23 July 1916 age 20.
Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France, Pier and Face 6 B
Son of William Jenkin Giles and Elizabeth Ann Giles, of Central Buildings, Deri, Cardiff.
Herbert Gregory Herbert Gregory
Private 32614 Welsh Regiment 16th Battalion.
Died 15 March 1916.
Grave III. E. 6, Le Touret Military Cemetery, Richbourg-l’Avoue, Pas de Calais, France
William John Haskoll William John Haskoll
Serjeant 248 Monmouthshire Regiment 1st Battalion.
Died May 25 1915, age 31.
Grave VIII. D. 43, Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
Son of Daniel and Margaret Haskoll, of Tynewydd Cottages, Argoed, Newport, Mon.
John Hawkins John Hawkins
Private 15809 Welsh Regiment 18th Battalion.
Died 24 March 1918.
Bay 6, Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.
Brother of Samuel Charles Hawkins below.
Samuel Charles Hawkins Samuel Charles Hawkins
Sapper 151311 Royal Engineers 253rd Tunnelling Company.
Died January 20 1916.
Panel 4 and 5, Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.
Brother of John Hawkins above.
Herbert Gregory Jenkins Herbert Gregory Jenkins
Serjeant Air Gunner 1132754 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
Died 5 December 1942, age 21.
Section I, Grave 2545, Gwaelod-y-brithdir Cemetery, Nr Bargoed, South Wales.
Son of Rees and Sarah Jane Jenkins, of 22, Upper Road, Deri.
John Jenkins John Jenkins
Lance Corporal 8/16445 South Wales Borderers 8th Battalion.
Died between December 15 & 16 1917, age 35.
Grave B. 277, Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece.
Husband of Mary Jenkins, of 77, Treharne Rd., Caerau, Bridgend, Glam.
Stanley Millward Jones Stanley Millward Jones
Lance Corporal 2735632 Welsh Guards 1st Battalion.
Died 9 January 1942, age 24.
Section I, Grave 2744, Gwaelod-y-brithdir Cemetery, Nr Bargoed, South Wales.
Son of John and Margaret Jones, of Deri.
William Jones William Jones
Gunner 28668 Royal Field Artillery 527th Howitzer Battery.
Died November 4 1918, age 28.
Grave Div. 62. II. P. 6, Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, Seine-Maritime, France
Son of Hannah Jones, of 22, Edward's St., Miskin, Mountain Ash, Glam.
William Jones William Jones
Private 7016 Royal Irish Regiment 2nd Battalion.
Died 24 May 1915.
Panel 33. Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.
Husband of Margaret Jane Jones, of 4, Bargoed Terrace, Deri, Cardiff.
Thomas Lewis Thomas Lewis
Private 23725 Welsh Regiment 16th Battalion.
Died February 8 1916.
Grave VI. K. 2, Merville Communal Cemetery, Nord, France
Thomas J MacCarthy Thomas J MacCarthy
Driver WT4/123212 Army Service Corps 4th Auxiliary Horse Company.
Died 8 November 1918, age 22.
Grave V. E. 48, Longgueness (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.
Son of Mary O'Keeffe (formerly MacCarthy), of 119, Bailey St., Deri, Cardiff, and the late Daniel MacCarthy.
James Henry Price James Henry Price
Leading Aircraftman 1406561 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve B.S.R.U.
Died 7 November 1944, age 21.
Plot 9, Row 2, Grave 28, Oostende New Communal Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.
Son of William and Ada Price, of Deri, Glamorgan.
Jenkin Richards Jenkin Richards
Private 202908 Welsh Regiment 9th Battalion.
Died 17 April 1918, age 23.
Panel 93 to 94, Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Husband of Edith Jane Curran (formerly Richards), of 66, Bailey St., Deri, Cardiff.
David William Roberts David William Roberts
Sapper 151320 Royal Engineers 253rd Tunnelling Company.
Died 13 March 1916, age 21.
Panel 4 and 5. Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.
Son of Mrs. Sarah Roberts, of 14, New Rd., Deri, Cardiff.
Benjamin Thomas Benjamin Thomas
Sapper 86109 Royal Engineers 170th Tunnelling Company.
Died June 3 1915.
Panel 1, Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.
David Walters David Walters
Private 15557 Welsh Regiment 11th Battalion.
Died March 27 1917.
Grave D. XVIII. 5, Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta.
Samuel Weeks Samuel Weeks
Private 15981 Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry 2nd Battalion.
Died April 5 1915.
Grave III. A. 31, Lille Southern Cemetery, Nord, France.

Alexander Andrews

Alexander Andrews was born 4 March 1899 at Keynsham Workhouse, near Bristol. In 1901 he lived with his grandparents William and Mary Andrews and their daughter Susan, age 10, in Kingswood, near Bristol. His mother Annie E Andrews was a domestic servant living elsewhere. In 1906 his mother married Sydney Bennet; and in 1911 Alexander lived with his mother, a sister Edith, age 7, his stepfather, stepbrother Sydney and stepsister Florence. His mother was 28 and had been born in Aldershot Barracks.

He enlisted in Cardiff but at what date is not known. He was in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers before transferring to the Royal Irish Regiment. He died of wounds 11 November 1918 (Armistice day). His residence was recorded as Deri.

In his will he left everything to his sister Susan Westlake, 18 Glynmarch St., Deri - she was in fact his aunt Susan. No doubt that is where he was living when he enlisted.

Peter Blake

Peter Blake was born in early 1888 to Peter and Elizabeth Blake in Tonypandy. His father was a coal miner, originally from Cornwall, his mother was from Pontypool. In 1891 the family was living in Cumberland, but by 1901 they had returned to Wales and were living at 16 Cambrian Way in Deri. In 1911 the family were still living in Deri, at 7 Bargoed Terrace.

Peter however had joined the South Wales Borders September 9 1907, he was described as 5ft 3in, 113 lbs with dark brown hair. But by November 22 he was in the guard room awaiting trial. His was court martialled on November 28 at Brecon, was sentenced to 84 days imprisonment, and on December 2 was discharged from the army with ignominy. He served his sentence at Swansea gaol and was released in February 1908. In 1911 he was living in Abertillery working underground as a coal haulier. It is not known when he rejoined the army, when he gave his residence as Deri, but he arrived in France with the Shropshire Light Infantry February 5 1915. Less than 3 months later he was killed in action April 15.

Wilfred Alfred Clevey

William Alfred Clevey was born 7th May 1923 to Florence and Thomas Clevey of Deri Newydd. He was educated at Deri Primary School and Bargoed Grammar School. William, or Bill as he was known, was the middle of five children, Janie and Ted being the elder and Joan and Kenneth being the younger siblings. 
At the age of 20 he joined the Royal Air Force and volunteered for Bomber Command, a particularly brave decision as it was well established that the chances of survival were slim with 75% causality including 50% fatalities. After his basic training he was transferred to specialist training as radio operator and air gunner. Bill’s first posting to active service was flying night missions over occupied France, Netherlands and Germany in a twin engined Wellington bomber. He later joined 576 Squadron, at Elsom Wolds, which was being equipped with four engined Lancaster bombers. While on leave he married Rose Hannah Hughes from Gwerthonor Road, Gilfach.
Early in May 1944 Bill was transferred to 103 Squadron which was also based at Elsom Wolds. His new pilot was Squadron Leader Leonard Ollier DFC, AFM. RAF records of his final mission, on 28 May 1944, show he was in Lancaster ND362 PM-Q (call sign Q for Queenie) targeting the railway system outside the city of Aachen, Germany. The purpose of the mission was to cut the railway communications to the West, thus preventing German reinforcements reaching the D Day landing beaches due just a few days later. Apparently, bombs were successfully dropped on target but no further communications were received from the aircraft. Both British and German attempts to discover the fate of the aircraft failed to find any form of wreckage and it has to be assumed that they were either attacked by German night fighters that were known to be active over the North Sea, or that the aircraft was hit by heavy flak (anti aircraft fire) on the Dutch coast (which also claimed another aircraft from the same squadron returning home). It was usual to receive a distress radio message from a bomber under attack or in trouble. As radio operator this would have been the responsibility of Bill Clevey. However there was no message. It has been officially assumed that either the aircraft exploded from a direct hit or the radio operator was wounded or killed.

Flight Sergeant CLEVEY is remembered on the Deri and Bargoed Memorials

Reginald Clifford

Reginald Clifford was born October 1886 in Bathford, near Bath. His father George was a farm labourer, his mother was Alice Ann. In 1901, age 14, he was a baker lodging with a blacksmith's family in Widcombe a few miles from his birthplace. By 1911 he was a coal-miner lodging, with his brother William, at 38 Bailey St., Deri with the Angel family.

He enlisted at Bargoed in September 1914 and joined the Royal Field Artillery. He was killed in action at the Battle of the Somme 17 July 1916, and was buried at Danzig Alley British Cemetery, Mametz.
Deri CliffordR Bathford
He is also remembered on the War Memorial in Bathford, as is his brother Albert.

 

James Cooper

James Cooper was born in Blaenavon about 1874. At the time he joined the Royal Engineers he was a 41 year old miner living at 74 New Road, Deri, with his wife Martha and 7 children. He appears to have joined 250 Tunnelling Company direct from civilian life in the early months of 1916.

The Company was then based in the area around Kemmel opposite the Messines Ridge. When Cooper joined them 250 Company were beginning to dig the deep-level mines of Petit Bois, Peckham and Spanbroekmolen. These were three of the nineteen mines that would be successfully detonated under the Messines Ridge in June 1917. The year leading up to the attack on the ridge saw intense enemy activity both above and below ground. German countermining and artillery fire would kill three men from 250 Company in April 1916 and seventeen men in June 1916. Only one man died in May, James Cooper. At this stage it's unclear how he died but what we do know is that it wasn't due to the Germans.

The 'Soldiers Effects' database shows him as having been accidentally killed on 8th May 1916. Cooper is buried in the Forges-Les-Eaux Cemetery, which is just north east of Rouen, many miles from where 250 company were operating. There was a British Red Cross Hospital in Forges-LesEaux so it seems likely that Cooper wasn't killed in the accident but died at or on the way to hospital.
   [from Gelligaer Tunnellers by Peter Walker - GHS Journal Vol 23 (2016)]

 

David Davies

Deri DaviesD MIDavid Davies was born in Dowlais about 1888 to Ruth and Enoch Davies. He was the fifth of nine children. He married Margaret Jane Harries 28th December 1910. They had two children Violet, born at the end of 1911, and Margaret, born just prior to the war in 1914. His wife died shortly after Margeret's birth. After David Davies' death the children were raised by an aunt in Dowlais.

David Davies gave his residence as Deri when he enlisted at Bargoed. He went to France 29 December 1915 and was killed in action 1 July 1916

Information and Photo courtesy FindaGrave website

Isaac Thomas Davies

Isaac Thomas Davies was born 28 November 1882 at 7 Jenkins Row, Deri, to Sarah Ann Davies. In 1881 Sarah Ann was 16 years old and worked loading coke. She lived with her parents Thomas and Mary Davies, and a much elder brother Abraham, at 7 Jenkins Row. Both her father and brother were coal miners. Sarah Ann had been born in Tirphil, but the family were originally from Rhymney.
Sarah Ann married Richard Williams in early 1885 and in 1891 the family lived at 14 Cambrian Street, Deri. All the family used the name Williams including Isaac T. Abraham Davies lived in lodgings in Deri.
In 1901, 18 year old Isaac T Williams was head of the family living at 7 Herbert Street in Brithdir. He was a coal smith working aboveground. In the family were his mother Sarah Ann, brothers George (13) and William (7), and uncle Abraham, all, including Abraham, recorded with the surname Williams.
In 1908 Isaac Thomas Davies married Sophia Jenkins and in 1911 they were recorded as living at 17 Upper Road, Cwmsyfiog, the village in which Sophia had been born, just across the Rhymney River from Brithdir. They had a 2 year old daughter. Isaac was a coal miner.
Isaac Davies was killed in action 23 October 1918. It is not known whether he and his wife had other children. 

Ralph Augustus Duck

Ralph Augustus Duck, born 1895 in Deri, was the son of Edgar Albert and Matilda Duck. His father had been the school master at Deri school from at least 1881 to his death in 1903; his mother was the daughter of John Jarman who had been Minister at Tabernacle in Deri. Until his father’s death the family had lived at the school house. In 1911 he was living with his mother and elder sister Elsie at Gwyn Villas. He had been attending Pengam School since 1906. He enlisted in July 1915 and joined 50th Battallion Machine Gun Corps.
Deri Duck courtesy Peter Bennett50th MGC joined 17th (Northern) Division on the 12 February 1916. In the Spring of 1916 they were in action at the Bluff, South East of Ypres on Comines Canal and then moved south to Somme seeing action at the Battle of Albert, in which the Division captured Fricourt and the Battle of Delville Wood. In 1917 they moved to Arras and saw action in the First and second Battles of the Scarpe and the capture of Roeux. Later that year they moved to Flanders and were involved in the first and second Battles of Passchendaele. On the 24 February 1918 the Division joined the 17th Machine Gun Battalion.
Ralph was wounded on 9 August 1918 and died of his wounds the following day. He is buried in Vignacourt British Cemetry, Somme, France.

David James Evans

David James Evans, born about 1882 in Deri, lived at 4 Market St., Dowlais with his mother Elizabeth and step-father David Edwards. The 1901 census records him as having a sister Sarah. 1911 his step-father’s niece Beatrice M Humphries also lived with the family (in 1901 she appears to have been recorded as his grand-daughter). David J Evans married Beatrice M Humphries in the June quarter of 1914.
It is not known when he enlisted in the Welsh Regiment. He was killed in action at Langemark 25 October 1914. He has no known burial place and is remembered on panel 37 of Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

William Evans

William Evans was born in Tirphil in about 1893 to John (born Vaynor) and Mary Jane (born Bedwellty). The family was recorded in Tirphil in the census of 1891, 1901 and 1911. His father was a coal miner, as was William in 1911 when he was 18.

He enlisted at Pontlottyn on 8 September 1914, giving his residence as Deri. As did Samuel Weeks who was posted to 2nd Battalion and died of wounds 5 April 1915.

William Evans, after his initial training with the Duke of Cornwall Light Infatry, was posted to the 7th Battalion on 22 September 1915. The 7th Batallion was deployed at Loos at the time and played a minor part in that battle. The Regimental History records that the weather was cold and wet and much time was spent ensuring the trenches did not collapse. The 7th Battallion War Diary reports that this sector of the front line was quiet on the 26th, and unusually William Evans' death in action was not recorded. So it is not known how he died. 

David Robert Gabb

Deri GabbDR MIDavid Robert Gabb, born March quarter 1904 in New Tredegar, was the son of Robert and Margaret Gabb. He moved to Deri in 1930 when he married Tydfil Mary Williams. He was known as ‘Bob’.
He joined the 1st Battallion Monmouthshire Regiment which became a Searchlight Regiment, which, in 1940, was transferred to the Royal Artillery. He was killed in an accident in 1941 and is buried at Gwaelod-Y-Brithdir Cemetery.

Edgar Francis Giles

Edgar Francis Giles was was born in Deri in 1895 and lived at 2, Central Buildings, Deri with his parents William and Elizabeth Giles and his siblings. He was employed at an outfitters in ‘Giles’ Emporium. He was 5ft 8 inches and weighed 135 lbs.

Edgar was a volunteer and enlisted into the Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry on the 22nd November 1915. On completion of his training, Edgar was posted to 1st Battalion probably about May 1916.

The Somme Offensive opened on the 1st July 1916 and on the 14th July the 1st Battalion set out to march to join the battle. They took their place in the line facing the enemy and held Longueval Ridge on the 19th July. On the 22nd July the 1st Battalion moved into position to attack High Wood, to the northern edge of the strong German position along the Longueval Ridge. At 3.30am they attacked, but were repulsed with heavy losses. Edgar was one of those killed during this action. His body was never recovered.

His sister Florence’s fiancés was also killed and she remained a spinster working at the Giles Emporium until she retired.

                         Courtesy Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry (DCLI) Musseum

Herbert Gregory

Herbert Gregory was born in Deri in 1896. In 1911 he lived at 20 Upper Cefn Road, Deri with his mother and siblings. Before he enlisted he had been working as a miner at Groesfaen Colliery. Herbert was the uncle of Herbert Gregory Jenkins who was killed in 1942 during World War II

He first entered the theatre of war in France on December 4 1915.

Deri GregoryH WM 19160404Western Mail April 4 1916

William John Haskoll

William John Haskoll was born in Deri in 1884 the son of Daniel & Margaret Haskoll, but later moved to Tynewydd Cottages in Argoed. He was an active member of the St. John Ambulance before enlistingDeri HaskollWJ.

On 25th April 1915 the Germans began shelling an area in France, later to be known as the battle of St. Julien. Records show that the Germans fired as many as 45 to 68 shells an hour. It was during this heavy bombardment that William was wounded. However, despite his severe wounds he used his experience in the St. John Ambulance to put a makeshift splint on his leg. He used his medical training for a number of days as he went around looking after his wounded comrades, but he sought no medical assistance for himself. Eventually his leg became severely infected by gangrene. He was taken to hospital in Boulogne, where he died of his wounds.

Sergeant Haskoll was buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery in France. His name appears on Roll of Honour in Bedwelty Church. For more on him see Gelligaer Journal Volume 23 (2016) pages 154-156.

John Hawkins

Deri HawkinsJ WM 19180419John Hawkins was born in Deri in 1892. In 1911 he lived at 87 Bailey Street, Deri with his parents and siblings, including his brother Samuel who was also killed in the Great War.

He first entered the theatre of war in France July 18 1915.




Western Mail April 19 1918

Samuel Charles Hawkins

Samuel Charles Hawkins was born in 1894 in Deri. His father was a stoker (Boiler man) on the surface of one of the local collieries whereas Samuel and his brothers John and Bryn became colliers. Someone who he would have been very familiar with in Deri was David Roberts, who was the same age, lived in the next street and had the same job as Hawkins. Their fathers were both boiler stokers as well. Hawkins and Roberts enlisted in the Duke of Cornwalls Light Infantry together 8 September 1914 and  were posted to the 8th Battalion for training at Sutton Veny Camp near Salisbury. Both ran foul of military authority during training and each was awarded 'company punishment' and loss of pay on several occasions.
The two young men from Deri landed at Boulogne with the 8th Battalion DCLI 22 September 1915 but the Battalion didn't see action on the Western Front, as with the rest of the 26th Division they travelled to the South of France, to Marseilles, where they embarked for Salonika at the beginning of November.
Neither Roberts or Hawkins sailed with the rest of the 26th Division. Like other former Welsh miners in the Division they were transferred to the Royal Engineers to become tunnellers. Along with the other men they probably spent several weeks at the RE deport or with another tunnelling company before joining 253 Company when it was formed in January 1916.
253 Company began operating at Sailly Labourse and the front line areas of the old Loos battlefield, north of the Vermelles-Hulluch road where tunnellers were badly needed to counter the German miners who were very active. Before 253 Company's arrival in the area two enemy mines had already been fired and shortly after they started work two more enemy mines were fired, under the British infantry in the front line. Ten tunnellers from 253 Company, five of whom were Welsh, were killed in their first month of operation. Samuel Hawkins was one of five men killed on 20 January 1916 when a German mine destroyed 15 feet of a British gallery and 20 feet of an adjacent trench. His body was never recovered and so he is remembered on the Loos Memorial. He was 21 years of age.
His friend David Roberts did not survive him for very long as he was  killed 13 March and is also remembered on the Loos Memorial. Samuel's younger brother John Hawkins was killed March 1918.

Research Peter Walker - for more on local Tunnellers see GHS Journal Vol. 23 (2016)

Herbert Gregory Jenkins

Herbert Gregory Jenkins, born 1921, was the son of Rees and Sarah Jane Jenkins of 22, Upper Cefn Road, Deri.
Herbert was killed when, returning from an air raid over Europe, his plane crashed in the UK. He is buried at Gwaelod-y-Brithdir Cemetery.

His uncle Herbert Gregory, also from Deri, was killed in 1916 during the First World War.

John Jenkins

John Jenkins, born about 1882 at either Bryncoch farm or Ysgwyddgwyn Isaf farm, both near Deri, was the son of Adam and Mary Jenkins, whose ancestors had farmed locally for many generations. In 1881 the family lived at Bryncoch farm but in 1891 and 1901 they were at Ysgwyddgwyn farm. In 1911 John was farming at Bryncoch farm.
Lance Corporal John Jenkins died in Macedonia in 1917. The Register of Soldiers’ Effects mentions his heir as being his wife Mary. It is not known whether they had any children.

Stanley Millward Jones

Deri xWW2 JonesSMStanley Millard Jones, born 1917, was the son of John and Margaret Jones of 3, Brecon Terrace, Deri. In 1939 he was a colliery bellman.
He died in Sturminster, Dorset in January 1942 and is buried at Gwaelod-y-Brithdir Cemetery with his sister Dorothy who died in August 1938 aged 16.

William Robert Jones

William Robert Jones was born in Deri about 1890. In 1901 he lived, at 22 Edward St, Miskin, Mountain Ash, in a family made up of Edward Jones, age 38, a coal miner, his wife Hannah, aged 44, son David, age 14, son William R age 10, and daughter Sarah age 7. All were born in Dowlais except William who was born in Deri. In 1911 the family were still living at 22 Edward St, except for David, all now being recorded as having been born in Dowlais. William Robert was a coal miner. The census also records that Edward & Hannah had been married 12 years.

He first entered the war 16 September 1915 in the Balkans (possibly Gallipoli). He died 3 years later in France. Further research may reveal more about his war service.

Thomas Lewis

Thomas Lewis was born in Deri about 1885 to Mary and William Lewis. In 1891 the family lived at 2 Bailey St., Deri. About 1895 they moved to Gilfach and in 1911 the family, father, mother and twelve children (7 sons, 5 daughters), lived at Bell Grove, 8 Maes-y-graig St., Gilfach. Thomas and two of his brothers were coal miners, his father and one brother were colliery repairers. On November 7 1912 Thomas Lewis married Florence Gertrude Ford at Gelligaer Parish Church. It is not known whether they had any children. Thomas Lewis enlisted at Bargoed, and arrived in France December 4 1915. He died of wounds on February 8 1916 and is buried in Meriville in northern France. On October 9 1916 his younger brother Gordon also died in France and is buried in Genay about 20 miles to the south (see Bargoed & Gilfach War Memorial).

James Henry Price

James Henry Price, born 1923 in Mountain Ash, was the last of ten children born to William and Ada Price.
On 6th November 1944 Aircraftman James Henry Price left Tilbury Docks in Essex on Landing ship (Transport) No. 420, in convoy with Landing Ship (Transport) Nos. 200, 320 & 405, en route to Ostende. The convoy arrived in Ostende at about 1330hrs on 7th November. The Port was closed and the four ships were ordered to return. The weather was Westerly Gale Force 7/8. Landing Ship (Transport) No. 420 struck a sea mine at 1500hrs. Of the 265 Airmen aboard, only 32 survived. Leading Aircraftman Price’s body was recovered from the sea and is buried in Oostende Communal Cemetery, Belgium.

Deri xWW2 PriceJH

Jenkin Richards

Deri RichardsJ WM 19180620Jenkin Richards was born in Rhymney in 1895. His mother died when he was young. The family moved to Deri some time after 1901. In 1911 he lived at 35 New Road, Deri with his father Henry, step-mother and brothers. In 1915 he married Edith Jane Evans and they lived at 22 Glynmarch Street, Deri.
His widow was later Edith Jane Curran having remarried in 1919

Western Mail
June 10 1918

 


David William Roberts

David William Roberts was born in 1894 in Bargoed. His father was a stoker (Boiler man) on the surface of one of the local collieries whereas Roberts was a collier and his elder brother Thomas was a haulage engine driver. Someone who he would have been very familiar with in Deri was Samuel Hawkins, who was the same age, lived in the next street and had the same job as Roberts. Their fathers were both boiler stokers as well. Roberts and Hawkins enlisted together in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry on 8 September 1914 and both were posted to the 8th Battalion for training at Sutton Veny Camp near Salisbury. Both of them ran foul of military authority during training and each was awarded 'company punishment' and loss of pay on several occasions.
The two young men from Deri landed at Boulogne with the 8th Battalion DCLI on 22 September 1915 but the Battalion didn't see action on the Western Front as with the rest of the 26th Division they travelled to the South of France, to Marseilles, where they embarked for Salonika at the beginning of November.
Neither Roberts or Hawkins sailed with the rest of the 26th Division. Like other former Welsh miners in the Division they were transferred to the Royal Engineers to become tunnellers. Along with the other men they probably spent several weeks at the RE deport or with another tunnelling company before joining 253 Company when it was formed in January 1916.
253 Company began operating at Sailly Labourse and the front line areas of the old Loos battlefield, north of the Vermelles-Hulluch road where tunnellers were badly needed to counter the German miners who were very active. Before 253 Company's arrival in the area two enemy mines had already been fired and shortly after they started work two more enemy mines were fired, under the British infantry in the front line. Ten tunnellers from 253 Company were killed in their first month of operation, five of whom were Welsh. Samuel Hawkins was one of the five men killed 20 January 1916. His body was never recovered and so he is remembered on the Loos Memorial. He was 21 years of age.
The underground battle against the Germans would continue apace for several months to come but like his friend, David Roberts did not live to see its conclusion. On 13 March 1916 he was killed in action along with two other men from 253 Company. There is some ambiguity about how he and the other men died. The war diary for the Company makes no mention of fatalities on that date but does record that an officer, NCO and several men were affected when gas from one their own mines fired that morning blew back into an adjacent trench. Such an incident would not seem to tie in with the fact that Roberts has no known grave and is remembered on the Loos Memorial, unless he was perhaps buried very close by and his grave was later lost? He was 21 years of age.

Research Peter Walker - for more on local Tunnellers see GHS Journal Vol. 23 (2016)

David Walters

David Walters was born in Deri, in 1891, to Thomas and Mary Walters, both of whom had been born in Pontlottyn. In 1911 the family lived at 19 New Road, Deri, 20 year old David was a coal miner. It is not known when he enlisted but he landed in France in September 1915. Later while serving in Salonika, Greece, he was transferred to hospital in Malta where he died of Blackwater fever, a complication of Malaria.

Samuel Weeks

Deri WeeksSSamuel Weeks was born in Deri in April 1890 to Mary and William and Mary Weeks. He was the youngest of 8 children who lived at 1, Chapel Street. He worked as a coal miner and survived the 1909 Darran Pit explosion, but his 24yr old brother James was killed in the accident. He married Ann Griffiths in 1911, However she died soon after giving birth to a daughter Annie Doreen in December 1911. His daughter was brought up by her grandparents.
He volunteered to enlist, along with six others from Darran mine including his brother Henry John, at Pontlottyn on 8th September 1914. Having completed his initial training he was posted to the 2nd Battalion on the 23rd February 1915. At this time the 2nd Battalion was holding a sector of the front in the area of Messines, a few miles south-east of Ypres. The battalion War Diary for the date of Samuel’s death record that the 2nd Battalion had taken over trenches in Sanctuary Wood at 2am.
Samuel’s brother Henry fought with the Welsh Fusiliers during the Great War and lived to return home.

See Gelligaer Journal Volume 25 (1918) for a short article on Samuel Weeks by his grand-niece Pauline Moore

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